Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Tymoshenko PM by one

Yulia Tymoshenko appointed Prime-minister of Ukraine for a second time.

In what was a laborious, tedious and marginally victorious event Yulia Tymoshenko was declared elected with a majority of one.

226 out of 450 members of Ukraine's parliament one by one raised their hand and voted for Tymoshenko.

The roll call and show of hands was required in order to ensure that members of her own coalition who are opposed to her appointment towed the party line. Proposals to hold a secrete ballot having been rejected by parliamentary coalition.

Yulia Tymoshenko failed to achieve the required absolute majority one week a go. Yulia Tymoshenko and others falsely claimed the Parliamentary electronic voting system malfunctioned or was subject to sabotage. An investigation by Ukraine's Security forces (SBU) ruled out malfunction or sabotage stating that the system was in correct working order.

Having failed to secure support first time around for appointment of the President's nominee Viktor Yushchenko, following threats and intimidation against dissident members of the coalition,resubmitted Yulia's Tymoshenko's nomination. The required show of hands was a way and means of ensuring that those disident members support Yulia's appointment or face dismissal.

Under Ukraine's constitution the Parliament may with the support of a majority of the parliament pass a resolution of no confidence in the prime-minister forcing the dismissal of the prime-minster and the government. One vote is all that is required.

Yulia is on tender hooks as Ukraine enters a period of political instability.

Political commentators anticipate fresh parliamentary elections will be held within 12 months with the opposition in a position to emulate the actions of the governing coalition by resigning their mandate and forcing fresh parliamentary elections at a time of their choosing.

Many believe that a move on Yulia Tymoshenko will occur soon after Ukraine's President and Our Ukraine manage to secure agreement winding back the democratic reforms that saw Ukraine transforemd from a presidential dictatorship to a parliamentary democracy more in line with European standards.

It is unknown if Party of Regions, the largest political party in Ukraine, will support the president's proposals to turn back the clock and reinstate presidential rule.

Unless Yulia can secure the support of bloc Lytvyn her tenure as prime minister will once again be cut short.

2 Comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm glad you're posting on your site again. Hopefully this will be on a regular basis again.

May I suggest you make the case for a broad coalition -what would be the benefits?

ukrainetoday said...

Thanks. As I have commented in the main post Unless Yulia can secure the support of Lytvyn her tenure is doomed to failure.

Ukraine's future is best served by a full Parliamentary democracy in line with European Standards. The previous parliament was heading in the right direction. The immediate problem facing Ukraine is Yushchenko and Our Ukraine.

Our Ukraine have always been the main problem. They were the main cause for the collapse of the so called Orange Coalition.

Yushchenko and Our Ukraine are not proponents of democracy to the contrary their polices and actions are undemocratic. Yushchenko was the main cause for political instability and he is teh cause of Ukraine's ongoing divisions. The sooner Ukraine can get a new president the sooner it can begin to develop and strengthen its parliamentary system. The days of presidential should be relegated into the past. Ukraine must build its nations together and learn to act responsibility and in the best interest of Ukraine.

It is hard to know where Yulia Stands. If she has sold her soul and principles. If Yulia supports teh return of power to the president then yes she also is heading in the wrong direction.

Europe is a federation of parliamentary democracies and Ukraine's future is adopting European standards of governance whilst maintain a close and cooperative relationship with all its neighbours. Divisive politics must come to an end and will only do so when Yushchenko is no loner in office.

I share the view that Ukraine will suffer as a result of the instability and division created by Yushchenko and his team.

We can expect early presidential and parliamentary elections in 12 months time. Hopefully with a parliamentary system still in tact.